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100 Ways to Home Educate: With The World!

Today I am taking part in a Home Education Blog Hop initiative, here is a little about what Home Education looks like for us.

Home Education for us: 

If I had to describe our style it would be Semi Structured dabblers in Worldschooling. This basically means when we’re ‘at home’ we follow a loose and flexible timetable with subjects and activities guided by E’s interests and future plans, but we also try to take lots of breaks around the world and country, of varying lengths of time, to discover and learn about different areas and cultures.

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We try to adventure, rather than holiday, doing things a little differently to a standard package holiday where we can. At the moment we are exploring the Southern Hemisphere (have a look at my recent blog posts for more information) but have also traveled by train to Italy, driven around France for a month (sleeping in the car as well as camping) and stayed with friends in Spain. In addition we try to get out and about in the UK including camping in Cardiff, a few days a year in London, Chester Zoo (which is an awfully long drive from Cornwall!) and more.

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What have we covered so far on our current adventure? So much it’s hard to know where to start, but I will try to summarise some of the points! We have learnt about time zones, body clocks and jet lag. We have experienced these first hand, as well as the opposite seasons in the other hemisphere. Currency conversion and cost estimation while out and about, as well as supply and demand affecting pricing – just why did our laundry cost so much to have done on the ship?! We’ve looked at native species, deadly species, cautions for them, and sun safety. We’ve seen a dam, learnt how and why it was built, and the strong relationships formed plus other benefits of those from different cultures coming together with different skills. We talked about evolution and natural selection, multiple times, and the risks of introducing species to an area. We’ve seen differing coastlines and mountains, a rain forest and icy cold waterfalls, learnt about sounds and fjords. There have been discussions about relationships between settlers and natives, what we think went well, what didn’t and why that might have been. We’ve all learnt lots about earthquakes, volcanoes and glaciers, which led onto a discussion over dinner about natural disasters and any ways we know to protect ourselves from them (duck and cover, seek higher ground, enter a basement etc). We’ve seen and talked about Maori traditions that still live on, learnt about the Haka and what it really is and means, beyond rugby!

I’m sure I’ve missed plenty, and I’m sure there will be plenty more to come. To put it into perspective a little, we’ve been away for precisely three weeks. I feel we’ve covered far more in that time, in far more depth and breadth, than we could have at home, and we still have another week to go…

Some background to what we do, and why:

E came out of school at the end of year three, after a change of schools crushed his optimism and love of learning. He plans to do his GCSEs as an external candidate, studying the material from home. Maths and Science are his favourite subjects, and I have insisted he also sits the exams for English and studies the material for French (as he has been learning French for several years now). He also covers computing (including coding/programming) within his timetable. Then there’s the local Home Ed trips out and meetings to juggle.

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O is not Home Educated at the moment, although he has been in the past, currently he is studying at college for his A levels and he went to a small independent school to sit his GCSEs as he has Asperger’s Syndrome so mainstream school  was not able to meet his needs and he did not wish to sit exams as an external candidate. His school set up has meant we’ve had greater flexible for adventure than many families with one or more children in school.

Blog Hop:

Previous blogger:

The Start:
http://liveotherwise.co.uk/makingitup/2017/02/06/100-ways-to-home-educate-launching-a-blog-hop/

 

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Snail

Almost time for T-Day

So it’s just another 10 days until we head off on our Italian adventure. I have rapidly gone from feeling really organised to totally panicked about not having everything ready in time. How does that happen?!

Our three cases lay open in the spare bedroom so we can throw stuff in as it’s bought or we think of it. Our rucksacks felt incredibly heavy, so packing choices have been reviewed. We have three cases (all with wheels): Hand luggage size, Medium size and Large size; for the 9 year old, 14 year old and me to drag across Europe. I have decided to shove, I mean pack, all the heavy ‘on the train’ stuff in the little case, guide books, activities, snacks etc. This will, hopefully, mean lighter rucksacks while still avoiding the need to rummage in the bigger cases en route.

Much discussion has gone on already with the boys about what they may wish to do, we will all look at the guide books on our journey to select some sites to see and the boys have a notebook and pencil case each to make lists, take notes and write a journal if they wish. We have a challenge for the whole break, that is to try at least one food each day that is specific to that country or region. The challenge reaches a head in Paris, on our way home, where we will all try snails and frogs’ legs, we will each put in 2 Euros and whoever eats the most snails (or most of one snail) wins the lot. This was the idea of O, 14, who ordinarily resists trying any new foods!

I doubt I will blog again until we are on our way and, as this is a laptop free break, all blogging wil be via my smartphone from then on. I fully suspect panic will further set in from now on, so blogging will totally be bottom of the list!