Prehistoric Bread

So far we’ve baked flat breads using the Neolithic (late stone age) and Iron Age heritage flours. The Bronze Age wheat had a failed harvest last year, so that flour won’t be available until the Autumn – we’ll revisit the prehistoric bread then.

To accompany the baking we had a Neolithic to Iron Age workshop at the local museum, and a Hunter Gatherer style foraging walk which included building a fire on the beach and cooking some flat breads on hot stones, together with the foraged plants, seaweed and molluscs.

We’ve certainly covered a lot of extended history around both eras, finding an in depth series of videos on YouTube that covered Neolithic to Iron Age origins from the fertile crescent across to Europe.

The baking surprised us all. There was so much flavour in the breads that were made with nothing more than flour and water. The heritage flours were also much thirstier than their modern counterpart, needing quite a bit more water to form a dough.

For the Neolithic bread, the thinner the better it seems. The thicker patties remained doughy inside, and not as tasty.

 

Slightly thicker breads were best with the Iron Age bread. Just thick enough to rise up a little when cooking, forming a pitta like pocket. Thinner ones were too crispy, and lacked the extra flavour, too thick was still doughy in the middle.

Both prehistoric breads were delicious dipped in houmous, which we realise is not authentic to the period šŸ˜›

The ‘recipe’ was just flour and enough water to make a dough.
Leave to stand for twenty minutes before kneading.
Divide into flat patties.
Leave to stand again.
Heat a heavy based frying pan, dry, with no oil or butter.
Cook the patties on each side until done.

For May we will look at Romans, we have our Romans workshop at the museum next week.

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