Dry Run With Friends

2016-05-14 19.24.44

A weekend of dry weather and friends wanting to wild camp in their converted camper locally meant we jumped in, with our nowhere near ready set up, for a single night test run.

It differed from the planned adventure in July in several ways:

  • Our car is far from ready
  • We are far from having everything we need
  • We have a foster dog at the moment, as well as our dog
  • The weather is nowhere near as warm as we hope it will be
  • It was only one night, and was very local
  • So we had a lot less gubbins than we will have – but that’s fine because the storage isn’t quite sorted yet

Despite these differences there was much value in doing it. It helped to spot things that were or were not needed as well as any pitfalls from what we already had – for example the carabiners for the bags were not big enough to go on the handles above the doors as planned.

The dogs loved the space, the training leads were ideal for hooking them up to the load D rings in the car (neither has great recall at the moment!). We took the foster dog (Gilda) in the car overnight, and our friends took our dog (Indy) in their van. Gilda slept fine in the bed on the front passenger seat, and Indy slept fine in the bed in the living area of the van.

2016-05-14 19.23.40

 

 

The beds fit in beautifully, and both of us found them comfortable and spacious.

There is lots of space under my bed for storage, and I have ordered a couple of Really Useful Boxes to slide underneath. One for kitchen bits and food, and one for dog bits and food.

There should also be enough space on top the the boxes to slide our camping chairs and the ‘bog in a bag’.

 

 

There is a fair bit of space in all the footwells, apart from the driver’s seat, and I have also ordered Really Useful Boxes for each of them – one each for mine and my son’s clothes and the third for ‘bits and pieces’ such as wipes, towels, bog refills etc. There will be space on top of these for other things too.

The cubby holes along the roof will be used for underwear, toothbrushes, toiletries and tablets etc. The door pockets will hold the curtains, sunshades and anything else not already housed.

All in all it was a resounding success, and very reassuring in terms of feasibility. We really had loads of storage space. We’re hoping the weather will be kind, and allow us another test run before our friends set off on the road early next month.

 

Non Diet, Food Replacement?

2016-05-16 12.24.31

A cousin of mine shared something on social media last week. It was an article looking at a meal replacement drink. She, and her friends, were adamant that the author had merely failed to read the instructions properly, or not tried the right flavour. In any case, I had never heard of such a thing before.

I’ve seen, and tried, diet meal replacement shakes (for the flavour, not the dieting qualities I might add), and they’ve always been quite yummy. I sometimes find I don’t have time to eat properly at lunchtime as I’m so busy herding the children in my house (not all mine, I’m earning a living as a childminder presently), preparing their nutritious meals, refereeing disagreements, and ensuring the food is actually eaten. I thought I might try the product in question.

I went to their website and ordered a trial sachet of the flavour recommended by my cousin and her friends, after almost passing out at the prices. It came, and I vowed to wait until I had the time to prepare it carefully and properly, to give it the best chance on the trial run – did I mention the price?!

So, taking heed of the article and comments on my cousin’s post, I started to prepare my drink. Cold water, powder and then blend for 20 seconds. I have a Nutri Ninja IQ, so just used that to blend the mixture, then stuck a straw in it.

First impressions? Not disgusting, but not particularly nice either.

I pressed on, determined to give it a chance. It had a bit of a powdery texture to it, and a really strange taste.

Still I continued. By now I was getting a really horrible aftertaste in my mouth, tasting a bit like sweetener.

I gave up at this point. I couldn’t finish the drink. The aftertaste lingered, and I had to find some chocolate to try and mask it. Some two hours on, and I’m still tasting it. All in all I managed about 200ml.

The sample cost me £4.99, larger packs are, obviously, much more expensive. I think it’s safe to say I won’t be parting with anymore money on this one!

Prehistoric Bread

So far we’ve baked flat breads using the Neolithic (late stone age) and Iron Age heritage flours. The Bronze Age wheat had a failed harvest last year, so that flour won’t be available until the Autumn – we’ll revisit the prehistoric bread then.

To accompany the baking we had a Neolithic to Iron Age workshop at the local museum, and a Hunter Gatherer style foraging walk which included building a fire on the beach and cooking some flat breads on hot stones, together with the foraged plants, seaweed and molluscs.

We’ve certainly covered a lot of extended history around both eras, finding an in depth series of videos on YouTube that covered Neolithic to Iron Age origins from the fertile crescent across to Europe.

The baking surprised us all. There was so much flavour in the breads that were made with nothing more than flour and water. The heritage flours were also much thirstier than their modern counterpart, needing quite a bit more water to form a dough.

For the Neolithic bread, the thinner the better it seems. The thicker patties remained doughy inside, and not as tasty.

 

Slightly thicker breads were best with the Iron Age bread. Just thick enough to rise up a little when cooking, forming a pitta like pocket. Thinner ones were too crispy, and lacked the extra flavour, too thick was still doughy in the middle.

Both prehistoric breads were delicious dipped in houmous, which we realise is not authentic to the period 😛

The ‘recipe’ was just flour and enough water to make a dough.
Leave to stand for twenty minutes before kneading.
Divide into flat patties.
Leave to stand again.
Heat a heavy based frying pan, dry, with no oil or butter.
Cook the patties on each side until done.

For May we will look at Romans, we have our Romans workshop at the museum next week.